lauramashburn43

prostheticknowledge:

Armadillo-T

A compact electric car than can fold in half when parked - video embedded below:

The small and light electric car completely folds in half when parking, making it a perfect fit for public or private transportation in an urban environment.

Looking for a parking space for hours at a busy shopping mall or being stuck on roads jammed with cars releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide are all-too-familiar scenes for city dwellers.

A group of researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) recently developed a possible solution to such problems: a foldable, compact electric vehicle that can be utilized either as a personal car or part of the public transit system to connect major transportation routes within a city.

In-Soo Suh, associate professor of the Graduate School for Green Transportation at KAIST, and his research team introduced a prototype micro electric car called “Armadillo-T,” whose design is based on a native animal of South America, the armadillo, a placental mammal with a leathery armor shell.

The research team imitated the animal’s distinctive protection characteristic of rolling up into a ball when facing with threat from predators. Just as armadillos hide themselves inside the shell, Armadillo-T tucks its rear body away, shrinking its original size of 2.8 meters (110 inches) down to almost half, 1.65 meters (65 inches), when folding.

More at KAIST here

lauramashburn43

prostheticknowledge:

Armadillo-T

A compact electric car than can fold in half when parked - video embedded below:

The small and light electric car completely folds in half when parking, making it a perfect fit for public or private transportation in an urban environment.

Looking for a parking space for hours at a busy shopping mall or being stuck on roads jammed with cars releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide are all-too-familiar scenes for city dwellers.

A group of researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) recently developed a possible solution to such problems: a foldable, compact electric vehicle that can be utilized either as a personal car or part of the public transit system to connect major transportation routes within a city.

In-Soo Suh, associate professor of the Graduate School for Green Transportation at KAIST, and his research team introduced a prototype micro electric car called “Armadillo-T,” whose design is based on a native animal of South America, the armadillo, a placental mammal with a leathery armor shell.

The research team imitated the animal’s distinctive protection characteristic of rolling up into a ball when facing with threat from predators. Just as armadillos hide themselves inside the shell, Armadillo-T tucks its rear body away, shrinking its original size of 2.8 meters (110 inches) down to almost half, 1.65 meters (65 inches), when folding.

More at KAIST here

kiliemae1992

thechronologicalsuperman:

The Bulleteers
“Superman” Theatrical Cartoons - March 27, 1942

Even moreso than the old theatrical Looney Tunes and Mickey Mouse cartoons, which relied heavily on sight gags, the Fleischer Studio Superman cartoons are some of the most visually dense animated shorts in the history of the medium. For the last several generations of Westerners who have grown up on cycled animation, re-used clips and backgrounds, lowered frame rates, static faces and gag or dialogue driven cartoons, the old Superman series presents a genuinely cinematic experience.

Although you will miss out on the full experience, it’s possible to watch animated shows like Archer, The Simpsons, The Venture Brothers, et al, and periodically look away from the screen without missing the essence of the story. The Superman cartoons, however – and the Bulleteers being a prime example – rely almost entirely on the visuals to communicate the action and atmosphere. Imagine missing not only the sight of the Bulleteer’s deadly vehicle smashing buildings in vibrant explosions, but the looming spectacle of the loudspeaker booming out over Metropolis from the precarious mountain lair, the cathedral ceilings of City Hall, the shadowbox scale of the police scattering before the oncoming missile of doom …